What To Consider When Choosing A Car For Your Kentucky Teen

So, you are purchasing a car for your teen. What are the things you should consider? What are the best elements to think about? Well, there are three main elements to consider when picking a car for your teenager driver.

Related: Consumer Reports Release A List Of Cars To Avoid

These include:

1) Stability
Used cars are usually a parent's first choice when selecting a vehicle for their teens. They tend to be cheaper and more affordable. This may sound like a good deal, but the truth is, it is not for everyone. The latest car models have advanced safety features that suit young drivers, stability being one. Parents can have the peace of mind knowing that the vehicle their child drives offers protection against the common causes of road accidents - crashes, skidding and blind spots.

2) Overall cost
This is where much of the compromising takes place. The more advanced the car is, the more costly it is. Consider how much you can spend on their car and find out the best one that fits within that range. Also, be open with your teen about the budget you are looking into so they can set their expectations. Factor in other expenses aside from the cost of the car such as: insurance, gas, registration and fuel economy.

3) Appearance
This factor is not as crucial as the first two, but it can influence the kind of negotiations you are going to encounter with your teen. They understand your concerns about the price tag, but they are also worried about the appearance of the car as well.

Big, slow and ugly cars
There was an article by USA Today called "Cars for teens should be big, slow and ugly." In this article, Mr. Adrian Lund, president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, said that midsize and larger cars provide more protection to the occupants. Slow vehicles, meanwhile, present less tendencies for teen drivers to let out their wild side when driving. Also, not that ugly in the sense that you would not dare to drive it. Instead, an ugly car with the looks that would not make your teens want to take it out every single time.

Related: Teens Remain Greatest Risk In Auto Accidents

As a Kentucky Accident Attorney, I want to make sure that our teen drives are in a car appropriate for them. Also, I agree with Mr. Lund’s recommendation on going for bigger cars for more protection. I have also explained this in my book, The Family Survival Guide To A New Driver. Here are a few more tips for both parents and their teens:

  • Conduct test-drives on potential cars. The best way to find out if a car is a good match for your teen is to have them test-drive it.
  • There is no one-size-fits-all rule when purchasing cars. Drivers have varying concerns. It's important to discuss with your teen the features you are looking for in a vehicle before visiting physical stores. Check out online reviews.
  • Compare before saying yes. Look into as many sellers as you can about the vehicle you are interested in. The first attractive offer may not always the best there is in the market. Explore your options.

Do not let your child talk you out of the car you want them to have. However, try not to make decisions without consulting with them. Make them understand that this is above all, for their safety. It's an interesting time in your teen’s life and while you want to take safety into consideration, don't miss out on having fun with a cool time in your teen's life.

Suggested book: The Family Survival Guide To A New Driver

Michael Schafer
The Personal Injury Attorney for Louisville and Kentucky
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